Converge & Ingest Colloquium Program & Online Gallery

Welcome to Converge and Ingest:  Learning About Digital Preservation, our first colloquium! The live event took place on Tuesday, October 23, and it was a big hit, with 45 in-person guests and 59 online guests. Our thanks to attendees, the fantastic presenters, and Wayne State University’s School of Library and Information Science for their support of the evening.

If you attended the event, whether online or in person, we’d like to get your feedback to improve future events: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dGZuUHFoSVN3ZHVyODRndkdKYkZORkE6MQ#gid=0

Many of our participants have given permission for us to post their presentations/posters during the colloquium and for a short time afterwards for the benefit of our online attendees and distance students. We thank them for sharing their work. To view the .ppt or .pdf of each presentation/poster, please click on its title. 

A recording of the event will be available later this week. Please check back, or like our Facebook page, we’ll let you know when the recording is posted. See a slideshow of colloquium images here (courtesy of Camille Chidsey).

Copyright (all rights reserved) is held by each individual presentation creator. Please contact them individually for use permission information.

The WSU NDSA Student Organization was founded in January 2012, as the first student chapter of the NDSA.
The NDSA Mission: 
 The mission of the National Digital Stewardship Alliance is to establish, maintain, and advance the capacity to preserve our nation’s digital resources for the benefit of present and future generations.
Our Mission:
 We strive to build local and regional digital preservation awareness, and seek to build our knowledge base and technical skills in digital content management.

PROGRAM

Welcome & Introductions
6:00 – 6:15 PM
Lisa Phillips, WSU NDSA Student Chapter President
Kimberly Schroeder, Faculty Advisor for WSU NDSA Student Chapter
Stephen Bajjaly, Associate Dean and Director of SLIS at Wayne State University

Presentations and Q&A Session:
6:15 – 8:15 PM

A Conservator takes on Digital Preservation”, Kevin Driedger
Kevin Driedger is a Wayne State University SLIS alumnus, and former adjunct faculty.  He is a librarian at the Library of Michigan with responsibilities for conservation, digitization, and cataloging.  He recently completed training to be a Library of Congress Digital Preservation Outreach and Education trainer.  He hosts the blog Library Preservation 2, which can be accessed here: http://librarypreservation2.blogspot.com

“Imagining an Ecosystem: Selecting a Digital Collection Platform for the Library”, Graham Hukill
Graham Hukill is a Digital Publishing Librarian in the Wayne State University library system, working on the Digital Publishing Team as part of the greater Collection Management and Discovery Services (CMDS) department. His primary responsibilities include helping to manage the online Institutional Repository (Wayne Digital Commons), curating and managing digital collections, and the maintenance of library affiliated websites.  He started in July of this past summer, in the midst of a lot 0f exciting projects and initiatives in the realm of digital collections and preservation in his new department.

“Data Curation on Trips to the Stars”, Nick Krabbenhoeft
Nick Krabbenhoeft is a second year student in digital preservation and data curation. He has written DMPs for MATRIX at MSU and evaluated commercial off the shelf digital preservation systems at the Center for Research Libraries. He has had a long-term interest in space travel and its impact on modern expectations of instantaneous data.

“Dissemination Information Packages for Information Reuse”, Jessica Schaengold
Jessica Schaengold is a graduate student at the University of Michigan School of Information, specializing in Archives and Records Management and Preservation of Information. Her talk stems from her work as a research assistant for the past year on the project “Dissemination Information Packages for Information Reuse” (dipir.org) under University of Michigan School of Information professor Elizabeth Yakel.

“Desks Drawers and Trusted Repositories: Digital Preservation in an Academic Library”, Lance Stuchell
Lance Stuchell is the Digital Preservation Librarian at the University of Michigan, where he advises the library community and leads in the continued development, implementation, and management of a comprehensive digital preservation program. Prior to joining the University Library, he served as the Digital Archivist at The Henry Ford’s Benson Ford Research Center and Digital Preservation Projects Coordinator at the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR). Lance received his undergraduate degree in History from Northwestern University and an MSI with a concentration in Archives and Records Management from the School of Information at the University of Michigan.

Poster Session & Appetizers/Refreshments:
8:15 – 9:00 PM
Poster session featuring research and work by alumni and current SLIS students from Wayne State University, University of Michigan, and Indiana University.

Understanding Preservation Metadata:  PREMIS vs. OAIS
Brianna Marshall is a dual-degree Master of Library Science and Master of Information Science candidate in the Indiana University School of Library and Information Science.  She has broad experience in digital projects, having worked for the Cyberinfrastructure for Network Science Center, the Kinsey Institute for Sex, Gender, and Reproduction, and IU’s Digital Library Program. After graduating in the spring of 2014, Brianna hopes to work for a digital library or digital archive.

DESCRIPTION: This poster will include information on the role preservation metadata plays in long-term preservation of digital objects. Much of the content will be focused on comparing PREMIS and OAIS, two metadata schemas widely considered the best for preservation purposes. Onlookers will leave with a broad understanding of preservation metadata as well as information about the similarities and differences between PREMIS and OAIS.

Archival Description Applied to Digital Formats and Digital Preservation: Maintaining Metadata throughout the Digital Preservation Process
Alexandra Orchard, SEIU Archivist, Walter Reuther Library; MLIS and Archival Administration Certificate from Wayne State University.  She was the first president of the WSU’s NDSA Student Organization, and presented a poster at Digital Preservation 2012. Her research interests are diverse and include metadata permanence, art, technology, and labor history.

DESCRIPTION: Technological progress has resulted in greater dependency on metadata in archival description as materials become more readily available in electronic formats, yet standard methodologies to solve issues in digital preservation have not yet been established. Traditional theoretical tenets and practice have been affected – as now archival material and description (i.e., metadata) must both be preserved, ensuring their authenticity and reliability, resulting in new potential theoretical models such as digital curation and digital historiography.

Current Issues and Future Solutions within Digital Preservation of Video Games
Aubrey Maynard and Courtney Whitmore, MLIS Candidates, Wayne State University.  Aubrey Maynard is the current Vice President for the WSU NDSA student chapter. She remember’s playing Super Mario Brothers for so long that when she quit, she could still hear the music. She still plays video games and found it fascinating to hear at Digital Preservation 2012 that video games were “at risk”.  Courtney Whitmore is in her my first term of the MLIS program at Wayne State and new to WSU NDSA. Her awareness of Digital Preservation of Video Games is recent, but interests her on a very personal level.   She is currently building a computer so that she can play Guild Wars 2 and still have the copies of her favorite PS1 games.

DESCRIPTION: Our presentation seeks to briefly introduce the topic of digital preservation of video games, highlighting the key goals of such efforts and importance to the larger field of digital preservation and society as a whole. It then focuses on the issues encountered in attempting to digitally preserve video games. This section is centered on the issues that stem from the complex nature of the video games themselves, the legal barriers to current and possible future efforts, and the mechanical difficulties in maintaining the aesthetics of the game experience. Lastly, it will deal with possible solutions to the obstacles at hand. This will include the steps that are currently being taken to overcome current difficulties, as well as those that could be further utilized, such as involving the various segments of the gaming community in dialogue.

DIY Archiving:  The GeoCities Project and the Future of Web Archiving
Camille Chidsey and Kelly Kietur, MLIS candidates, Wayne State University.  Kelly Kietur is currently a graduate student in the School of Library and Information Science at Wayne State University. She will be graduating in August 2013 with a Masters in Library and Information Science and a Graduate Certificate in Archival Administration. She earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Slavic Studies from Wayne State University. Kelly recently completed an internship at Allied Vaughn, working on the Michigan Women’s Hall of Fame and Historical Center Media Digitization Project, and currently works as a Graduate Student Assistant at the David Adamany Undergraduate Library at Wayne State University.  Camille Chidsey is a graduate student in Library & Information Science at Wayne State University. She will be graduating in May 2013 with her MLIS, a graduate certificate in Archival Administration and a concentration in Digital Content Management. She has experience working with several museums and archives, specifically with arts and cultural heritage collections. Currently, she is the head of the Audio & Digitization department at the Michigan Opera Theatre and a WSU Graduate Student Assistant at Purdy/Kresge Library.

DESCRIPTION: In April 2009 Yahoo! announced the closure of its web hosting service, Geocities. Founded in 1994 and purchased by Yahoo! in 1999, Geocities once was the third-most browsed website on the Internet. The closure meant a significant loss in Internet memory, as GeoCities was one of the first sites dedicated to personal web pages. After the closure announcement, a group of people known as Archive Team went into action, determined to archive everything.  This poster will discuss the work of Archive Team and their significance in preserving Internet culture, as well as the idea of archiving outside of the traditional institutional sense – all of the members of Archive Team are volunteers, many without any sort of archival background. Handout

Preserving Removable Media
Miriely Guerrero, masters student at the University of Michigan School of Information.  She is specializing in Records Management and Digital Preservation.

DESCRIPTION: This poster is based on a paper I wrote during my summer internship at the Bentley Historical Library.  I was tasked with researching the preservation factors involved in removable media, specifically magnetic and optical media.  I focused on identifying the variety of formats and capacities available, the necessary hardware and software to migrate data, physical considerations and then the use of digital forensic tools to respect the integrity of the content during migration.  My poster provides a summary of these details, including handling and storage concerns, as well as potential errors. However, in light of brevity, I did omit the digital forensics research.

Preserving Primary Sources: An SOS for Social Scientists?
Laura Gentry, MLIS Candidate, Wayne State University.  Laura Gentry is pursuing a master’s degree in library and information sciences and a certificate in Records and Information Management from Wayne State University.  She earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in history and secondary education from Ouachita Baptist University and a Master of Arts in history from The University of Alabama.  Laura has worked in two archives and special collections libraries, a public library, and an academic library.  Currently, she lives in Birmingham, Alabama and is the secretary for the WSU NDSA student chapter.

DESCRIPTION: Historians and other social scientists search archives and primary sources looking for insights on what life was really like for people of the past.  With the advent of digital sources, the recording of the present has changed and redefined the sources that social scientists will use 50 to 100 years from now and beyond.    This poster will look at different types of sources that are typically used by this group of researchers and as well as current initiatives at digital preservation.   With many of these initiatives in their infancy and many valuable resources in danger of not being preserved, this poster will present the efforts at digital preservation in regards to selection of materials, format, and migration of data.  It will also look at the challenges of preserving social media and the mining of the data by this generation of social scientists and for future researchers.

Contemplations for Migration: a Look at New Media Art
Kristin Johnson and Angie Yip, MLIS candidates, Wayne State University.  Kristin Johnson is a second year MLIS student at Wayne State University where she is specializing in the area of Digital Content Management.  She is the current Marketing and Events Chairperson for the WSU NDSA student chapter.  She earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in History from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.  Kristin currently works in a public library where she assists in the digitization of the library’s historic photograph collection.   Angie Yip is currently in her second year in Library and Information Science at Wayne State University, with a focus on Academic Libraries and Digital Content Management.  She also holds a Graduate Certificate in Museum Management and Curatorship from Fleming College, Ontario.  Her experience working with museum objects and digitizing art collections have driven her interest in new media art collections and the issues that surround their preservation.

DESCRIPTION:  Based on initial research, we were interested in how certain institutions conducted various projects in preserving their new media art collections.  Looking at institutions like the Guggenheim and DOCAM have inspired us to explore a specific preservation approach:  migration to new formats for future generations.  We will research the different ways professionals can migrate new media art into newer formats with current day technology, while still maintaining image and sound quality, as well as data integrity and artist expression.  Exploration into specific case studies will also help illustrate the strengths and weaknesses of migration as a preservation strategy.

Preserving Your Past:  Creating a Public Service Announcement Video on Digital Preservation
Camille Chidsey, Laura Gentry, and Lisa Phillips
MLIS Candidates, Wayne State University. Camille Chidseywill be graduating in May 2013 with her MLIS, a graduate certificate in Archival Administration and a concentration in Digital Content Management. She has experience working with several museums and archives, specifically with arts and cultural heritage collections. Currently, she is the head of the Audio & Digitization department at the Michigan Opera Theatre and a WSU Graduate Student Assistant at Purdy/Kresge Library. Laura Gentry is pursuing a master’s degree in library and information sciences and a certificate in Records and Information Management from Wayne State University.  She earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in history and secondary education from Ouachita Baptist University and a Master of Arts in history from The University of Alabama.  Laura has worked in two archives and special collections libraries, a public library, and an academic library.  Currently, she lives in Birmingham, Alabama and is the secretary for the WSU NDSA student chapter. Lisa Phillips is the president of WSU NDSA, volunteer librarian and archivist for Preservation Detroit, a local historic preservation group, and works at the Adamany Undergraduate Library Reference Desk. She gets asked, “What’s metadata?” at least once a week while reading her textbook on the bus and enjoys explaining it to strangers.

Preserving Uncommon Formats: Digital Audio Tapes and Executable Files
Jessica Schaengold, graduate student at the University of Michigan School of Information.  This past summer, she worked as an Electronic Records Processing Intern at the Smithsonian Institution Archives.  The internship took place under the Electronic Records Archivist in the Digital Services Division of the Archives.

DESCRIPTION: Digital Audio Tapes (DATs) and executable files are not stable for long-term preservation.  While DATs can easily be migrated to WAV files, the conversion requires a very detailed process and specialized equipment.  Executable files, however, cannot just be migrated to a new format.  Migration has a high risk of data loss and loss of functionality.  The Smithsonian Institution Archives is in the progress of dealing with DATs and executable files.  This project focused on both migration of DATs to a WAV container with embedded metadata as well as assessing and developing preservation options for their executable files.  The executable files represent a large range of activities within the Smithsonian branches, including mid-1980s word processors, databases from research institutions, and recently created moving images for exhibitions.

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6 thoughts on “Converge & Ingest Colloquium Program & Online Gallery

  1. Pingback: Converge and Ingest: A WSU NDSA colloquium | Ex tabulis

    • Hi Amber,
      Thanks for checking out the presentations. The webinar link was for the live event. I have changed the post to reflect that a recording of the event will be available later this week, so please check back, or like our Facebook page. We’ll let everyone know when the recording is up.

      I asked a few people to check the Driedger link, and there were no problems. If you maybe try a different computer or a different connection and still have no luck, let us know at wsundsa dot gmail dot com and we’ll try to make it available to you a different way.

  2. Pingback: WSU NDSA Student Chapter Colloquium (side note to BBMak) | The View from Yu

  3. Pingback: WSU NDSA Student Chapter Colloquium « Courtney Whitmore

  4. Pingback: Converge & Ingest Recap « kellykietur.org

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